A Big Bag Of Dolls Part Two


Today I thought I’d tell you about the rest of the dolls in the big bag that I was given recently. I’ve been trying to learn a little bit about them and surprisingly most of them have doll marks which has made it a little bit easier.

Dolls from the big bag of dolls.
Dolls from the big bag of dolls.

One doll that was not marked was this hard plastic girl who is in a crawling position. Apart from needing her hair untangled there was really nothing wrong with her. I opened up her battery box which was empty and popped in some AA batteries to see if she worked. I wasn’t really expecting her to but she did. As soon as I turned her on her earrings started flashing and she started making loud musical sounds. I was a bit startled at the volume but Cindy and Polly got an even bigger shock. I am in two minds about keeping this doll, as she works some child would enjoy playing with her but I’m tempted to keep her for the fun of watching pets reacting to her.


There is a doll marked Mattel about 13″ tall and using the heart-shaped mark on her face I was able to find out that she is Lil Miss Makeup Magic Jewel from 1988. she looks rather like a large Kelly doll. She still has her original dress which is in good condition but her hair is horribly tangled. That will be the biggest job with her. Once I’m happy with her she will go back to the Op Shop because these dolls really don’t appeal to me. Here she is after having her hair washed, conditioned and combed.

The next doll is vinyl with a cloth body and Asian features, tagged Mieler Dolls. She turned out to be quite interesting.  Mieler Dolls was a Hong Kong based company and they made these dolls in 1982 and called them “Chopstick Kids”.  They caused controversy as the dolls came equipped with a Hong Kong passport with an expiry date of 1997. 1997 was the year that the Crown Colony of Hong Kong was to pass from British rule to Chinese.  Controversy aside I think these dolls are rather cute. I have seen pictures of them in other sizes as well.

In 1984 Mieler produced another doll with  the same gimmick called “Rice Paddy Babies”. These were along the lines of Cabbage Patch Kids but I prefer the earlier ones. Apart from matted hair and a bit of dirt there was not much wrong with her. I will keep this doll and later on will make her a more appropriate outfit.

Soft bodied doll by Mieler of Hong Kong.
Soft bodied Chopstick Kid doll by Mieler of Hong Kong.

The largest doll in the bag is a vinyl baby doll which I initially thought was a Baby Born. I already have one so I didn’t examine it closely until I started to assess the dolls for cleaning. Then I realised that it was a bit more detailed than Baby Born and it is in fact a Berjusa baby. Unfortunately baby has some coloured marker stains although they won’t show once she is dressed. I will try to get them out though.I can see why people like to use these dolls for reborn baby dolls. This one is definitely a keeper. Berjusa dolls were first available in the USA in the early 1980s, today they are part of JC Toys who are also responsible for Berenguer. I think these are some of the nicest mass-produced modern baby dolls I have seen.

Berjusa baby doll.
Berjusa baby doll.

Finally there is a tiny doll marked Estrela, Brazil. I don’t have any Estrela dolls in my collection so she will be staying. She’s not going to take up much room. I was planning to write a post about the Estrela Barbie dolls one day so perhaps I will expand it to talk about some of the other dolls in the Estrela line.

Small baby doll marked Estrela.
Small baby doll marked Estrela.

Further Reading:

http://www.jctoys.com/aboutus.asp

http://www.itnsource.com/en/specials/reuters-digitised-highlights-july-2016/shotlist/RTV/1984/12/29/RTV291284002/

 

 

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