Our Ideal Dolls


I have written quite a lot about my Ideal Tammy family dolls and a little about Naomi’s Tuesday Taylor but both Naomi and  I do have some other dolls made by the Ideal Novelty & Toy Company so today I thought we would take a look at them.

Compositon Shirley Temple doll by Ideal c 1930s.
Composition Shirley Temple doll by Ideal c 1930s.

The eldest member of our Ideal family is our composition Shirley Temple. Naomi and I rescued her from an antique shop in New Norfolk a couple of years back and she is our most expensive doll. This Shirley was made in the 1930s.

Next, we have Posie Walker. Ideal’s Saucy Walker was first made in the 1950s originally of hard plastic although later dolls had vinyl heads. Posie Walker is a bend knee version of Saucy. My Posie is a transitional doll with a vinyl head and hard plastic body and limbs. The Ideal company was the first to begin making hard plastic dolls in the USA  after the end of World War Two.

In 1965 Ideal produced Goody Two Shoes a walking doll with a vinyl head and hard plastic body. Naomi spotted this doll in the Op Shop in Oatlands and showed her to me. I bought her for $5. Her shoes are permanently molded to her feet. It took me some time to decide who she was but I believe that she is Goody Two Shoes. She is not marked Ideal as far as I can see but she is marked made in Japan above the smaller of her two battery compartments. A lot of her body has tape over it and I suspect that she might have split in half at some point or perhaps the owner thought she might.

A couple of years later in 1967 Ideal released Giggles. I did not have Giggles as a child but I find her face very appealing and she was on my collector’s bucket list for a while before I bought her on eBay.

I think it is something about the faces that attracts me to Ideal dolls. I was very taken with Crissy who has a very pleasing expression and beautiful eyes. I love her red hair too. I don’t have any Crissy outfits yet so I made this for her some years ago.

 

There is one more member of our Ideal family who is not pictured here. That is Tearie Dearie. You may remember this little doll who was first released in 1964. She was a 9″ drink and wet doll. She came with her own cradle which could also be used as a baby bath. Naomi had one as a child and now has two in her collection but unfortunately, they have been in storage for several years now and she doesn’t have a photo of them. Once we move they will come out and have a post of their own. As I could not find a free-to-use photo of Tearie Dearie online here is a link to some photos of the dolls on Pinterest.

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4 comments

  1. Cute collection of Ideal’s dolls. I enjoy seeing the different dolls out of the past. So many of them that don’t always get much notice and should.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My Crissy was well loved, but her head was barely on so put her in Christmas sock outfit to cover it, I love ideal dolls. Even my rescues are up to many adventures, and look smart in just about anything I can scrape up. Giggles looks like a character..I’ll have to pick up an Ideal reference guide sometime soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely to see all your Ideal dolls. Of course, the Shirley Temple is a very special doll, but I particularly like the Posie Walker’s face. It is so typical of the 1950s and is truly charming. Giggles is the kind of doll that needs to be in everyone’s collection because looking at her makes everyone smile. She just looks so happy. The Crissy outfit you made suits her perfectly and really brings out her bright hair colour. All wonderful dolls, including your Goody Two Shoes.

    Like

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